Tuesday, 4 May 2021

Wildflowers and living walls.

 


After all the rain yesterday it was nice to get out for a walk, even though it was blowing a gale and very cold for this time of the year.

I had wanted to photograph the wildflowers growing on one of the many country lanes we have in my area, not the easiest task when the wind was blowing everything sideways.  

Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) has to be one of my favourite early summer flowers, I love the smell of this plant too.

Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris)


Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta)


Dandelion (Taraxacum)

Poppy


This empty snail shell in the wall has Lichen starting to grow on it.

Snail shell
 

The wall has many patches of Cladonia  this one might even be Cladonia fimbriata




This one has a Liverwort growing inside the cup.




The surprise of the day was finding 3 Common Footman moths- Eilema lurideola caterpillar under a stone on top of the wall, it seemed just to cold to be finding caterpillars .


Common Footman moths- Eilema lurideola caterpillar

Common Footman moths- Eilema lurideola caterpillar




I am starting to recognise some of the spiders I am finding now as I have had this one before, not far from here. This beautiful marked spider is most likely to be a Amaurobius fenestralis, 

Amaurobius fenestralis is a species of spider in the family Amaurobiidae. It is one of at least two common spiders found in houses known as lace-webbed spider, the other being Amaurobius similis. The specific name similis is based on its similarity to A. fenestralis. 

...the two cannot reliably be distinguished by eye however they can often be identified from the habitat. If in a garden or associated with houses then it is almost certainly A. similis, however if in woodland it is highly likely to be A. fenestralis.



Amaurobius fenestralis, 



Amaurobius fenestralis,

Another spider  in the wall was one I have found at home. Beautiful markings on this one too.

Toothed Weaver (Textrix denticulata)

Toothed Weaver (Textrix denticulata)

Other insects hiding from the cold wind were a 7-spot Ladybird and a Pupa, not sure what the pupa was as I did not like to disturb it any more than I had to.

7- spot Ladybird ( Coccinella septempunctata)

 
Pupa 

At the end of the path there is a lovely patch of White dead-nettle (Lamium album).

White dead-nettle (Lamium album).

White dead-nettle (Lamium album).

Sorrel (Rumex acetosa) was growing in the wall, sometimes called Common Sorrel, Garden Sorrel, Narrow Leaved Dock, Spinach Dock.

Sorrel (Rumex acetosa)

Common Mouse-ear (Cerastium fontanum)

Medicinally – be careful. Mouse-ear is edible and can make a healing tea to help relieve coughs and congestion BUT it looks quite similar to a plant named Euphorbia maculate which is poisonous. Make sure you know what you’re picking! (LINK)


Common Mouse-ear (Cerastium fontanum)



16 comments:

  1. Brilliant photos Amanda, as usual, but those macro shots are excellent. Love the Tetrix denticulata, Ive only seen one here, a lovely looking spider...

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    1. Thank you so much Stewart for leaving a comment. Tetrix denticulata is a good spider as it stays long enough to take a photo. Macro photography has opened up a whole new world.

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  2. I think you managed to get great photos despite the weather, I especially love the Dandelion :) It's always interesting to see such a variation with spider markings, I suspect many people don't notice at all! x

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    1. Thank you Pam for the lovely comment, they are tiny the spiders and you would not know they have beautiful markings just by looking at them.

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  3. What a stunning set of photos - the new camera picks up so much detail and you must be really pleased with it. Lovely to see a spider in such close up - a fascinating group to study :)

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    1. Thank you so much Caroline, has to be the best thing I have bought in a long time. There is always some thing to photograph.

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  4. What a beautiful post! I enjoyed all the angles and views. Enjoy the camera...no matter what camera you use, you're a great photographer!

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  5. Your white dead nettle photo blew me away, Amanda! Superb and somewhat ethereal like a fairy bonnet!

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    1. Thank you Caroline Gill, so pleased you liked the photos.

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  6. Lovely post and the spider photos are wonderful! I think I have come across that first spider before too as the Latin name sounds familiar. Well done finding so many interesting things when the weather is so bad (and for going out in the first place!).

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    1. Thank you so much Mandy, amazed at all the new things I am finding and able to photograph with the new camera. When you start looking at a new subject for example Spiders you soon realise how many we have, even just in your own garden.

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    2. I wondered if you had a new camera as the macros are really good. What did you get? Is it the same camera that is shooting birds too, as they are good shots too and I know how hard it is as birds are always too far away! My newest bridge has a 400mm zoom which isn't good enough really for bird photography and the macro is rubbish, yet I still love the camera and it is a very good general purpose camera, much better than my 'butterfly' camera which does good macro but rubbish for nice scenery! It's so hard to find a bridge camera that does it all, but I don't want to be taking out a load of lenses with a DSLR, or even two cameras really.

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    3. Hi Mandy, I got a Olympus TG-6 Tough Camera, especially for doing macro photos. You can also take it under water to take photos too. It just fits in your pocket which is great. Still have my Bridge camera for bird photography.

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    4. I had a look at that camera and it sounds really good. Have you had a chance to try out focus stacking? I expect you need a tripod, or very steady hands, for that. The other setting where it takes a number of macro shots at differing focal lengths sounds brilliant too. Have fun with the camera Amanda! xx

      P.S. Thanks for explanation about the Moor blog. I hadn't realised it was a separate one like your park, etc.

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    5. The photo stacking will work really well by holding it by hand, you just need to make sure the subject does not move, so a Sheild bug is a good example, spiders can move to fast. I bought a lens cover extra and a ring light that fits on the front. (not cheep) . I bought a bundle which you really don't need but it did come with a tiny tripod which I use most of the time.
      Have just done a post on my Park blog of the latest insects i have found.

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