Saturday, 19 May 2018

My... Mr Fly what big eyes you have...

Ramsons (Allium ursinum)

18 May 2018

To day was my first trip to Ben Rhydding Gravel Pits Nature Reserve this year, during the winter months it is a quiet place but in summer it bursts open with flowers and insects.

I had hoped to spot a few Early Orchids but nothing was showing, looking back last year it was June when I took this photo. But the leaves should have been showing.

June 2017


Chiffchaffs were out singing the Willow Warblers so hard to see amongst the trees now the leaves are out.

Field Forget-me-not

Ground Ivy
Wall speedwell
The edges of the path is covered in bramble and flowering Hawthorn trees, it was not hard to spot the many insects making most of the flowering plants.
The first of many Dameselflies



I still need to find a ID for this Damselfly, as you can see it is black with blue stripes, not blue with black stripes ... like the common blue.

Looks like it is a FEMALE AZURE DAMSELFLY




Red-and-black Froghopper - Cercopis vulnerata
Leafhoppers, planthoppers, froghoppers, treehoppers and cicadas are a sub-order of insects from the order Hemiptera.
There are around 400 species in the UK



Hoverfly 





Crosswort 

Crosswort is distinctive in that it displays tiny, yellow flowers that surround four-leaved whorls around the stem. The other yellow-flowered member of the bedstraw family, Lady's Bedstraw, has clusters of flowers at the ends of its stems giving it a more 'frothy' appearance.



Ramsons (Allium ursinum)


The bulb of the plant was used to create tonics to relieve rheumatic problems and lower cholesterol, and 
 this species can be used to aid identification of ancient woodland sites.

Ramsons (Allium ursinum)


The grove snail or brown-lipped snail
Beetles represent the largest insect group with around 4,000 species in Britain and 300,000 worldwide. They are easy to recognise as their front wings are hard, covering the second pair of wings and the abdomen. All beetles have biting mouth-parts.


I think this is a Green Leaf Weevil  (Phyllobius maculicornis)



Weevil
Wood Forget-me-not.

Although Water Forget-me-not may have been the source of many early garden varieties of this popular plant, most are now forms of Wood Forget-me-not. A pretty plant with bright blue flowers, Wood Forget-me-not can be found along woodland rides and edges, in ancient and wet woods, and sometimes in hedgerows and verges as an escaped garden variety. It flowers between April and June.

Wood Forget-me-not has hairy stems and narrow, oval leaves. Clusters of five-petalled, azure-blue flowers with white or orange centres appear at the tops of the stems.(LINK)

Wood Forget-me-not.

Snipe Fly /Male
Snipe-flies are active predators and can often be found sat head-down on fence posts or sunny tree trunks on the look-out for passing prey. They catch smaller insects in flight, taking them back to their look-out post to eat. The larvae live in soil and leaf litter, and are also predatory. The Downlooker Snipe-fly is the most common species. (LINK)

 Fringecup (Tellima grandiflora)



Common Carpet

This fly Gymnocheta viridis  had to be one of my favourite insects I came across to day, it's so ugly but amazing  at the same time. They adults feed on pollen and nectar, whilst the larva feed on caterpillars etc.

19 comments:

  1. Lovely insects, and your photos are incredible, as always! That field of Alliums is stunning! This looks like a place I would like to visit, too.

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    1. Thank you Beth, yes you would like this place, such a quiet spot to. Up to now they have recorded over 160 wild plants on the site including trees.

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  2. What a super reserve - a lovely set of images as always Amanda. I love the mass of Wild Garlic.

    You saw some wonderful wild flowers and insects - so pleased you got an id for the damselfly :)

    Enjoy the rest of the weekend :)

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    1. Thanks RR for the lovely comment, now I know there are a few different types of Damselflies to record I will pop back and see what others there are. They do all look the same in flight so better attention is needed.

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  3. Some beautiful photography there Amanda.
    I love the close up of the wild allium. So delicate, so pretty.

    Aren't there a lot of damselflies this year. I have never seen so many.

    Sadly only seen one swallow and it arrived today. Usually a few arrive in mid April every year.
    Our Spring has a lot to answer to.

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    1. Thanks Cheryl, this site is good for Damselflies and yes there were many flying about today. The water filled gravel pits make it a good place for Dragonflies too.

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  4. Your posts are always so informative. And you really take wonderful photos. You can really tell how big those flies eyes are! :)

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    1. Thanks Shazza, thank goodness for Google, I do like looking for little snippets of information on the things I find.

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  5. Great photos, it's lovely to see everything buzzing with life finally! xx

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    1. Thanks Pam, not sure if you have been to the gravel pits at Burley. A nice little place to stop of on your way home. Not a big site for birds but if you are lucky they have Snipe and pleny of butterflies during the summer months.

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  6. Hello, gorgeous collection of flowers. I love the snail and pretty moth? Nature is beautiful! Have a happy day and new week!

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    1. Thanks Eileen, it's amazing what you can find amongst the Bramble..

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  7. Wow!
    Wow!
    Wow!

    Fabulous photographs, so lovely to see. I enjoyed the information too.
    Thank you.

    All the best Jan

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  8. A very interesting set of images Amanda. The first Ramsons shot is just brilliant.

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  9. Your photos are wonderful and I just love the one of the wild garlic or ramsons. How waonderful to walk through there:)

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    1. Thanks Rosie, we went past this reserve last night on a cycle ride the wild garlic smelt lovely.

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  10. What a wonderful set of photos, Amanda, as always! I'm so glad to learn the name Field Forget-me-not as we have little clumps of it growing wild in the garden. Such tiny flowers! I've yet to see a Froghopper. And like you, I have not seen any orchid signs yet... The wild garlic photo is superb!

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