Tuesday, 30 January 2018

Norber Erratics in Austwick North Yorkshire.

29 January 2018

Norber Erratics

The Norber erratics are one of the finest groups of glacial erratic boulders in Britain. They are found on the southern slopes of Ingleborough, close to the village of Austwick in the Yorkshire Dales.

 Many of the Silurian greywacke boulders at the site are perched on pedestals of limestone up to 30cm high. The boulders were probably deposited by melting ice sheets at the end of the last ice age, around 12,000 years ago. The pedestals have developed because the erratic boulders have protected the underlying limestone from solution by rainfall, giving estimates of the rate of lowering of the surrounding limestone pavement of around 25mm per 1000 years.Recent cosmogenic dating suggests that the boulders have been exposed for around 17,900 years.(LINK)

Our family has lived in this area (Yorkshire Dales) for many years, despite all the walking we do, we had never been  to see the rocks.  I had seen them on Country File some years back and wanted to go see them.


We started in the pretty village of Austwick, walking up to the area we got lost a few times, but in the end we were not disappointed, the weather had been kind with beautiful blue skies and sunshine.





Robin Proctors Scar.

Robin Proctors Scar is to the left of the erratics, there is a story of Robin Proctor from 1893, who sadly rode his horse of the scar late one night. There is an inscription at the base of this climb recording the death. You can read the story HERE (just scroll to the botton of the page)


High up thre view was stunning.



We past the barn, following the track right to the top of the scar, very wet and muddy.

Some of the lower fields had large boulders in, even the wall's had been built round them.













All the rocks were covered in Lichen, moss and grasses growing in the cracks.




This rock shows one of the best example.




This rock looked like it could fall of the edge at the slightest touch.




A great day out, after a few slips and falls (Mum) in the mud we got back to the car as the heavens opened.

If you get chance it is well worth the long steep clime up the hill.


17 comments:

  1. A wonderful post Amanda and so interesting. No wonder you wanted to go and see the erratics - they are superb examples. A beautiful set of photos and the views over the Dales are just stunning - you do live in a really lovely part of the country :) Thank you for the link to the Robin Proctor story - makes fascinating reading. I will make a note of this area in the hope that one day we have another holiday in North Yorkshire.

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    1. Thanks RR, pleased you liked the post, stunning place. I hope to go back again during the summer moths as there will be wild flowers, I would like to find the marked stone too.

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  2. It is an amazing area, you can see why the ancients thought they were put their by some mystical greater power. We've been there several times and the last was a glorious summer day when the sky larks fill the air. Think it needs re-visiting this year. Thanks for the reminder :D

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    1. Thank you KA , for coming by and leaving a lovely comment,I too hope to go back during the summer moths and explore the area more.

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  3. Beautiful photos, we do live in the best county don't we! I'd not heard of the rocks before, they're quite amazing. x

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    1. Thanks Pam, you should spend a day up in North Yorkshire, have you been to Malham Cove? you can get to see the Peregrine falcons and Green Woodpeckers.

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    2. I have been to Malham Cove a few times but not in years, i'm going to make the effort to go later in the year :)

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  4. Superb photography as usual, Amanda! What a fascinating area. Malham Tarn is probably the closest I've ever been to the site. Is the old building a kind of farm shelter - like a Scottish bothy or perhaps like a Welsh shieling?

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    1. Thanks Caroline for the lovely comment, have to Tarn and Malham cove many times. There is so many amazing things to see in Yorkshire.

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  5. Wow, gorgeous views and scenery. I love the sheep. The boulders are cool, some looking to be well balanced. Beautiful post and photos. Happy Wednesday, enjoy your day!

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    1. Thanks Eileen for the lovely comment, glad you like the photos.

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  6. What an unusual but stunning landscape, your photos of the area are wonderful. Poor Robin Proctor and poor horse too:)

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    1. Thanks Rosie, amazing place. It was worth the steep walk up the hill. Hopefully I wil go back in the summer.

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  7. Wonderful series of images, both of the glacial erratics, and the rugged Yorkshire landscape, all accompanied by a lively and informative narrative.

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    1. Thank you David for stopping by and leaving a lovely comment.

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  8. Wonderful photos of an amazing landscape! The erratics have been on my 'to visit' list for so long, but I've not yet walked there!

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    1. Thanks Louise, I do hope you get to go, as its a stunning place.

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