Wednesday, 18 October 2017

Deer's at Fountains Abby Studley Royal

14 October 2017

John Aislabie was a socially ambitious politician, who fell from favour and retreated here to his Yorkshire estate to set about creating this elegant water garden.

Follies, statues and eye catchers were common features in eighteenth century gardens. There could be no finer eye catcher than the grand ruins of Fountains Abbey, which happened to be in his neighbour’s garden.

So that his guests could enjoy the magnificent ruins, viewpoints were created, with the majestic sight of the abbey a highlight of an eighteenth century tour.

John’s son William finally managed to buy the ruins in 1767 which meant that the abbey became part of the garden. William kept his father’s formal designs, but developed new areas of the garden to add wild, wooded and picturesque walks. (LINK)

St Mary’s Church





 When the estates of Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal were united in 1767, a celebrated medieval monastic ruin was incorporated into one of England’s finest 18th-century landscape gardens. The most significant later addition to this setting, now a World Heritage Site, is the Gothic revival Anglican church of St Mary. Created partly as a result of a tragic family death in 1870, St Mary’s Church was designed by William Burges in an eclectic Gothic style for the Marquess and Marchioness of Ripon in 1870 and completed in 1878. A masterpiece of an astonishingly inventive designer, it is rich in decorative detail and symbolism.(LINK)

Studley Royal deer park


Studley Royal deer park is home to three different types of deer, it is the start of the rutting season so there were notices to keep to the paths. The day was very warm for the time of the year so most of the animals were chilling out under trees or sitting in the sun.


There are many ancient trees in the Deer Park, some showing damage from the storms we have had had over the past year. The trees are made safe but are left to rot down, some were home to many different kinds of fungi.




Sweet Chestnut 







Fallow deer

These deer originate from France and were brought over during the Norman conquest. They were introduced to Studley Royal at the end of the 1600s. They’re a pale brown colour with white spots, but you do occasionally see an all-white or dark colouring, too. The male is called a buck, and have ‘palmate’ antlers (broad and flat). The female is known as a doe and her young as a fawn.





Studley Royal House

Manchurian Sika

These are the smallest and most timid deer in Studley Royal park. They originate in the Far East and have a white, heart-shaped marking on their bottom. The males are called stags with antlers like tree branches. The females are called hinds and their young are calves.








On the road that runs through the park, at one end you can see the St Mary’s Church and at the other end you can see  Ripon Cathedral.





Fishing Tabernacles & cascade

Female Pheasant 


Red deer

These are the largest in Studley Royal park. They’re indigenous to the UK and are usually a dark reddish brown. The male is called a stag and have large antlers shaped like tree branches. The female is called a hind and the young are referred to as calves.





Red-legged partridge




There is so much to see and do at Fountains Abby, there is the Abby it's self to look round which you have to pay but the Studley and the walk along the Seven Bridges Valley is all free. You have accesses to the shop, toilets and cafes so a great day out for all the family.

 Thanks to the National Trust for their hard work at keeping places like this open for us all to enjoy.
I have used some of their information throughout the post and the link can be found here.

25 comments:

  1. Hello, what an awesome post. The deer and birds are all beautiful, The Abby and church are beautiful. What a lovely place to visit. I am glad this is open to the public and well cared for. Great series of photos. Happy Wednesday, enjoy your day!

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    1. Thanks so much Eileen, we are very lucky to have such a lovely place close by, full of wildlife.
      Amanda xx

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  2. I enjoyed my virtual visit! Fountains Abbey has been on my list for years but I've not managed to visit yet.

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    1. Thanks Louise, you would love it here and it's lovely what ever time of year you go.
      Amanda xx

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  3. A really wonderful post Amanda with beautiful photos of the buildings, trees, deer and fungi. There is so much to see and do there - wish we could have gone when in Yorkshire so I am especially pleased to see all your photos.

    There are some wonderful fungi there and love all the ancient trees and that message to hug a tree :)

    It looks a superb place for a day out and worthy of many many visits. Thanks so much for such a super and interesting post.

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    1. Thanks RR for the lovely comment, another place you would like and hopefully if you come back to Yorkshire for a holiday you will get to visit.
      Amanda xx

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  4. Oh wonderful . I am very jealous of your visit. Its great that you saw all the varieties of deer. Autumn looks the perfect season to visit.

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    1. Thanks Shazza, photographing Deer was on my list to do this year, I was not disappointed with the amount there is on the park, beautiful animals. You would love it here great for kids as well.
      Amanda xx

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  5. It looks like beautiful and peaceful place to visit. X

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    1. Thanks Jules, I would be quite happy here spending a few days just wondering around, the ground are so vast and open. So much to see and do.
      Amanda xx

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  6. I would hate to find myself in the middle of a rut

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    1. Thanks Simon, I had gone in hope of seeing some action ! but so warm the Deer's were happy lying around. I hid behind a tree to take the photos just in case.
      Amanda xx

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  7. Whenever I see your beautiful posts, I realize I must travel to the U.K. again! So much to see with your beautiful countrysides. And your photos are captivating!

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    1. Thanks PP, for the lovely comment. You might have to take a looooooong holiday to visit all the lovely places we have over here.
      Amanda xx

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  8. Oh gosh, brings back memories of going with a group of people to a Victorian Music evening all in costume and arriving at a nearby youth hostel where we were staying after the concert much to the amusement/bemusement of fellow hostelers. Your photos are wonderful of the three types of deer, the fungi and the birds expecially the red legged partridge:)

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    1. Thanks so much Rosie for the lovely comment and it has brought back some lovely memories.
      Amanda xx

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  9. Oh I so echo your thoughts when you say ' Thanks to the National Trust for their hard work at keeping places like this open for us all to enjoy.'

    Another lovely post, and what a lot of deer there.
    Beautiful selection of photographs again, thank you.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Thanks so much Jan, there are many people behind these places who work hard for us all. I was pleased to see so many deer too.
      Amanda xx

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  10. Hurray! ... so far so good! And I love the new look, too, Amanda. And yes, it's the rutting season here on the Suffolk heathland, too. We love Fountains Abbey, but don't think I have ever been in the Deer Park. I didn't realise that Ripon Cathedral was visible from here - one of my favourites ... and with those amusing miserichords. Wonderful photos! You make me wish I could have gone out today, but the strength of the wind kept us at base. Still, there's always tomorrow, and it meant I did some useful things inside...

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    1. That is great news you can see my blog again (not sure what was going on before). Another place you would like as it's all part of Fountains Abby. Hope you managed to get out over the past few days, the weather has turned really bad here.
      Amanda xx

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  11. Lovely photos Amanda, I don't think i've been to Fountains Abbey since I was a child. Deer are such beautiful animals! xx

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    1. Thanks Pam, you must have another trip over, you have to pay for the Abby but the Deer park, parking, shop and cafe is all free to visit. There is so much wild life to see. Along the river on the Seven Bridges Valley walk there are Dippers to see.
      Amanda xx

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    2. I definitely will, I barely remember the last time I went! xx

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  12. A lovely collection of Deer Amanda.

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    1. Thanks Roy, lovely to see so many deer.

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