East Riddlesden Hall and Gardens





East Riddlesden Hall is a picturesque 17th century mansion built on the foundations of an earlier medieval hall house. The main part of the medieval house was rebuilt around 1630, with further remodelling in 1648 and again in 1692 when a new range, now ruined, was added to the earlier structure. It is the 1648 rebuilding which forms the larger part of the house we can see today.
The main 17th century rebuilding at East Riddlesden was probably by James Murgatroyd of Warley, and is considered one of the best surviving examples of 17th century vernacular Yorkshire architecture.






The first Hall at East Riddlesden was built in Saxon times by Cos Patric, Lord of Bingly. From 1125-1400 the Hall was owned by the de Maude family. In the early 14th century they built a simple hall house on the site of the present Starkie Wing. Then in the 15th century a farmhouse was built for the Paslew family just west of the hall. The property passed to the Rishworth family of Halifax when Robert Rishworth married Ellen Paslew.

In 1638 James Murgatroyd purchased the East Riddlesden estate from John Rishworth. Curiously, the sale agreement allowed Rishworth to keep using rooms in the Hall until his death. James Murgatroyd built the Great Hall as a temporary structure, but it is still in use today. When James died in 1653 his sons James and John both claimed ownership of the Hall. John Murgatroyd leased the Hall to the Starkie family without his brother's knowledge. The Starkies moved into the Hall in 1672 and took over ownership in 1708. They added the Starkie Wing and lived here until the family line died out in 1797.

During the 19th century the Hall was rented out by absentee landlords and occupied by a succession of tenant farmers. The last family to live at East Riddlesden were the Bailey family.


The Starkie Wing was torn down in 1905, leaving only one wall. In 1933 the estate was saved from being destroyed by the Brigg family from Keighley and donated to the National Trust. The Briggs brothers also re-purchased many interior furnishings that had been sold.

The hall is two storeys high and built of ashlar. The interior features large stone fireplaces and oak panels, with excellent plasterwork ceilings, and there are displays of pewter, oak furniture, and historic embroidery. The exterior features a grass maze and duck pond, set in a lovely country garden. The garden features colourful floral displays, including daffodils in Spring, clematis, flowering borders, and pink cherry trees.

One of the interior highlights is a secret hiding place for Catholic priests, created when Catholicism was outlawed during the Elizabethan period. There is a fascinating exhibit of 19th century samplers, and fabulous 17th century carved furniture.(LINK)




Kitchen




Getting Plastered 



In all the rooms in the hall there was someone who could tell you about it's history, this room had a stunning plastered ceiling. The story goes, they used Ale to make the plaster often drinking quite a lot, so that's were the  phrase "Getting Plastered" comes from. Here we can see what should be a Thistle head but they have made it into a man's face, there are three to be found. 

1800c  decorated room 
This was one of the nicest rooms, much brighter in the green rather than the dark wood.










Discovery Room



Great Hall



Saxon stone


The Falcon and Hunting Dog Mews 

When I have looked for similar buildings on the internet I have found nothing, even from people visiting the hall, not many showing this building not to mention the graffiti on the wall. I had hoped to discover more about it. 
In the gift shop you just got a map of the hall and gardens, later I found they to a book but there were none there today.


Ruined Starkie wing
Outside toilets




Dye Border, Gardener's shed
When I was at St Oswald's Church in Guiseley, the Church warden explained to me about the colours of the church robes, the ladies who dyed the cloth back then were very skilled. A lady who could dye Purple would be very well off as it was a hard colour to make, hence purple is used for the highest people in the church.

Formal Gardens


In the formal gardens between the showers there were plenty of Butterflies to watch, a Dragonfly and the Ivy was buzzing.


The Bothy

Nice place for coffee and cake, the buildings lovely too



The Great Barn

The Grade I listed Great Barn at East Riddlesden Hall is a 400 year old testament to the craftsmen who worked incredibly hard to build the magnificent structure.

I had come especially to look at the barn, but they were re-doing the roof so it was closed. The barn would have housed up to 42 animals and the muck would have been used on the fields. 
Roman numerals or marks can be seen on the large Oak beams, helping them to assemble the building.

It has been a lovely day just a shame the Barn was closed, I was not able to get a book on the Hall so have struggled to name all the rooms, there seems to be very little information on line. The Building is owned by the National trust and they are not giving much away on the web site. The Hall runs events throughout the year , especially known for ghosts so the Halloween events are very popular. 

Links;
National Trust-East Riddlesden  Hall


Heritage week
During and before I managed to see and visit some more churches.


















Comments

  1. It's truly a beautiful building. Whenever I visit old buildings I'm always drawn to the kitchens for some reason.
    It's a shame the barn was closed. X

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    1. Thanks Jules, for the lovely comment, the kitchen was a lovely room, with the light shining through the window. I will go back to visit the barn another day...
      Amanda xx

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  2. What a fabulous building I've enjoyed your photos and the historical background too. I'm putting the Hall on my list of places I'd like to visit:)

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    1. Thanks Rosie, you will love this place especially if you get to visit through the summer when all the flowers are out in the garden, they have a event at Christmas so it would be nice to see it all lit up fairy lights.
      Amanda xx

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  3. Hello, it is a beautiful mansion. I enjoyed the tour, it is great learning the history of this home. The ground are beautiful too. Too bad about the barn. Great collection of photos. Have a happy day!

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    1. Thanks Eileen, glad you liked the trip round the Hall, a lovely piece of British history.
      Amanda xx

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  4. What a wonderful place to visit - love all the photos and history :) A beautiful Saxon stone and super stone carvings. I had to smile at the toilet - you won' believe this but when I was about 10 or 11 we went on holiday to a cottage in North Wales and the toilet was in a shed at the bottom of the garden and was just a hole in a wooden plank just like the one in your photo - I have never forgotten it!!!

    A shame about the barn - you will have to return and perhaps they will have some books in stock too! I have a feeling you may be able to buy guide books on line - will try and find out and let you know.

    Looks a good place for Hallowe'en Ghost Walks!!

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    1. Thanks RR, the list is getting longer of places I know you would like to visit, on my Ant's farm I remember having to use these toilets as a child, very windy on a little bottom !
      I will be able to visit the barn again, and thanks for the link for the book, gave me some more ideas of other places to visit....
      Amanda xx

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  5. Found a link to National Trust shop where they sell them although not sure if you might have to pay postage and packing. https://shop.nationaltrust.org.uk/guidebooks/b257?p=2

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  6. It looks such a wonderful place to visit.
    Once again your photographs and descriptions were brilliant, thank you.

    I did like the Formal Gardens ...
    It was a shame the barn was closed, but you have shared a wealth of information - thanks again.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Thanks Jan, it's tucked away of the main road on the outskirts of Keighley , many people will have passed it not knowing it's there, but once you are on the grounds it's like stepping back in time.
      Amanda xx

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  7. Somewhere I have visited! It was lovely to have virtual re-visit through your photos :) I was there in early spring a few years ago and really enjoyed it.

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    1. Thanks Louise, nice to know you have been here and you enjoyed looking back over the photos. Quite fancy visiting the Christmas event, when the grounds are filled with fairy lights..
      Amanda xx

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  8. Very much enjoyed the visit! All that beautiful stone work - what a wonder of buildings and style of architecture

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    1. Thanks Jennifer for leaving a comment, buildings are my favourite thing at the moment, the older the better, I love looking for marks or names left by people long ago.. The Falcon and Hunting Dog Mews was wonderful .
      Amanda xx

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  9. It's a lovely place, great photos, what a shame you didn't get to see in the barn but a good reason to go back :) x

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    1. Thanks Pam, will pop back and see the barn... some of the events might be worth checking they have through out the year.
      Amanda xx

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  10. What a beautiful place and wonderful setting. I could get lost there, so much to see. I cannot imagine seeing everything in a day.

    I love the old doors.

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    1. Thanks Cheryl, yes it is lovely and more than one visit is needed to take in the beautiful setting.
      Amanda xx

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