Chevin, leaving a mark on the moor...



Otley and the surrounding area are steeped in history, all leaving their mark on the landscape. From the Roman fort at Ilkley, Anglo-Saxon Churches to Rock Carvings, Stone Circles, Enclosures and Cairns

Cup and Ring markers
They consist of a concave depression, no more than a few centimetres across, pecked into a rock surface and often surrounded by concentric circles also etched into the stone. Sometimes a linear channel called a gutter leads out from the middle.

Horsforth



Ilkley Moor & Rombald's Moor has over 300 recorded stones, with a few on the Chevin above Otley.

I went to see who has left their mark.




Looking across to Arthington you can see Arthington Viaduct, also known as Castley Viaduct and listed as the Wharfedale Viaduct, carries the Harrogate Line across the Wharfe valley between Arthington in West Yorkshire and Castley in North Yorkshire, England. It is a Grade II listed structure.


Knotties Stone Bronze Age Carved Rock


Knotties Stone marked with water
Not my photo (link)



Easy to find as it is marked on Google maps, well worn now.. it hard to see any marks.


Boundary Stones 




Stone Paths



Hidden notes

Modern day markers 

Sculptures 



Megalithic Stone Boundary

Ancient origin, probably marking an old property boundary








Stone walls



 Walker's Christmas tree 





Millstone grit rocks


Graffiti 






New stone carvings 



"Jenny's Cottage"




...for over 150 yr "Jenny's Cottage" was a popular destination for visitors to the Chevin, known for it's refreshments and hospitality. It was situated on the Chevin ridge and was known also as Chevin top house or farm, Jenny hill farm and Beacon house. The building was demolished in 1976.




The last thing to spot on my trip out today was the "BULL STONE"

This is a single standing stone of possible Bronze Age date that measures some six feet high and is highly weathered around its top. This weathering tells us that it has stood somewhere (not necessarily here), for a long time, and is not just an animal scratching post erected by a farmer in recent years. This whole area is rich in rock carvings, especially Ilkley Moor, and it is possible that this stone formed a marker, perhaps on a route to the moor, or even as a territorial boundary stone.(LINK)


It's far out in a private field , but from the Royalty Pub car park  you can spot it.




(well i think that's it !)



Comments

  1. Looks like an awesome place to explore. The rocks, stones, circles and carvings are amazing. I love the view of the viaduct. Great post and photos. Enjoy your day!

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    1. Thanks Eileen, I'm so lucky as there are so many places to explore in this area.
      Amanda xx

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  2. It's an entrancing landscape for sure. I'm always fascinated by standing stones. There were so many of them on our recent visit to Arran. X

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    1. Thanks Jules, so many things to find, often walking past them for years. Many more things to discover, which you could touch a stone and look back to the time it was put there.
      Amanda xx

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  3. What a truly wonderful area to explore. Such an interesting post - I would have been thrilled to find just one of the wonders that you saw :) I didn't realise when we were in the area last year how rich it is with prehistoric items. Lovely atmospheric photos as always and the views are just stunning. I think you will enjoy the Hidden Histories book when it arrives :)

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    1. Thanks RR, so much to find the more I look, emagin trying to find all the 300+ on Ilkley more, it would take all summer and they are still finding more ! Still hoping to have a look for a few before it gets to cold, not the best of places to be in winter. Hopefully the book should arrive tomorrow .
      Amanda xx

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  4. I always love your posts.
    You show us the most amazing places and your accompanying photographs and information is just brilliant.
    Thank you.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Thanks Pam for the lovely comment, I was a little worried people would not be interested in "stone" so glad you liked the post.
      Amanda xx

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  5. The stone walls are beautiful, the marked stones are amazing, and the history of civilization in your part of the world is incredible! Some of my ancestors were in the U.K. back a few generations. Of course, there's ancient history to be discovered in the Americas, too, which is also quite fascinating. Great post!

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    1. Thanks PP, lovely comment.. for such a small Island we had a lot going on over the years, It doesn't get any better than a Yorkshire stone wall..
      Amanda xx

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  6. It's lovely up there, i've spent so much time on the Chevin right from being little, lots of good memories, it's nice to see your photos :)

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    1. Thanks Pam, thankfully it never changes apart from the seasons, will be there for many more hundreds of years for people to enjoy...
      Amanda xx

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    2. That's a really interesting post...mum reckons she has a cup and ring rock at home

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    3. Thanks Simon, glad you liked the post, how exciting to have your own Cup and Ring stone...
      Amanda xx

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  7. That was a really interesting post :)

    There's so much to discover and learn about, so much history all around us that is so often never even noticed.

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    1. Thanks Louise, I met a old chap walking his dogs, I asked him about the stone, and did he know were it was , just recently a school group had been up looking at the stone too. He had walked up here for the last 35yrs and never seen or knew about it, I told him about the Saxon road and the Bull stone too. ' you have got me interested now ' he said

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