A quiet walk amongst the trees



Saturday saw a quiet walk round Esholt woods.
 Fungi was on the menu, trying to find specimens I have not seen before.
I have learned a few things about fungi over the past week, one is to have a little torch in your kit, as it can get quite dark amongst the trees and photos will come out a little dull. 
Photograph as many parts of the mushroom as you can . This will help later when you try to identify them.
 Another subject in nature which can be a hard subject to grasp. It can get a bit frustrating as they come with many English names, scientific names have been changed, but they still use both and on the internet many have the wrong name!

Please don't be put of as it's so much fun looking and coming across one you've not seen before, even if you don't know what it's called,  they are beautiful and strange.     

Coprinopsis atramentaria, commonly known as the common ink cap or inky cap


Tawny Grisette (Amanita fulva)


Acorns (never seen so many)

Bracken
The wood is full of mainly Birch and Oak.

1.On this just one branch there was a..
 Oak Apple Gall.
The Oak Apple Gall is caused by a tiny gall wasp, Biorhiza pallida. It can be found between May and June on oak twigs where the female has laid her eggs in the leaf bud. Inside the gall there are a number of chambers, each housing a larva which eats its way out. Adults emerge in June and July.

2.Not sure if this patch was made from a.. 
Leaf miner

3.Knopper Gall

The Knopper Gall is caused by a tiny gall wasp, Andricus quercuscalicis. It produces ridged outgrowths on the acorns of our native Pedunculate Oak; forming in August they are sticky and red, later becoming woody and brown. A second generation then develops in the catkins of Turkey Oak.



Common hawkweed, Snail, harlequin
and the only Sheild bug I have seen all year.





This lovely fungi was hard to spot at first, Lilac Bonnet (Mycena pura), one I have not seen before. Growing close to the leaf litter, I spotted one then like a magic painting your eyes see the others popping out of the ground. They were all growing in "fairy rings"  





Fairy Rings
by Michael Kuo
"You have found a fairy Ring deep within the forest, a circle of mushrooms . . . Some people will speak to you of spore and fungus circle. They would say that each season of growth fungus sprouts outside the edge of the space it filled the previous season. Moving ever outward leaving depleted ground within the circle. Those who have opened their minds, hearts and souls to the realms of magic may speak to you of the fairies. Those who know the fairies will tell you that fairy rings are where the Fairies dance and perform many of the rituals of their own magic."


                                                   Cramp Balls,  King Alfred's Cakes-Daldinia concentrica
Some fungi are very poisonous so a mistaken ID could have serious consequences.

Comments

  1. A wonderful selection of photo's and a good many different fungi with lots of different colours and textures.
    Looks like you've had a very good weekend

    All the best Jan

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    1. Thanks Jan, so many fungi to be discovered it's just finding them..
      Amanda xx

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  2. A magical post. Fungi looks so other worldly doesn't it. :)

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  3. A magical post. Fungi looks so other worldly doesn't it. :)

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    1. Thanks Shazza, a lovely subject, fungi. They take a good photo as they don't move which helps..
      Amanda xx

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  4. A lovely autumnal post with some great photos - it is wonderful to see what you can find in a woodland when you look closely. So many different species of fungi and super galls :) I did enjoy the piece of prose on fairy rings :)

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    1. Thanks RR, it takes a bit for your eyes to adjust to spotting them, very well hidden amongst the leaf litter.
      Amanda xx

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  5. You have taken some super photos of the fungi. I'm not knowledgeable enough to go foraging for them. We have been growing our own mushrooms on logs but disappointingly there aren't any this year - I don't know why. I love the piece about fairies - there is something enchanting about a woodland glade with mushrooms growing.

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    1. Thanks Wendy, as a kid we used to get up super early with my dad and go look for mushrooms for breakfast up in the hills by our home, not come across those mushrooms lately. Not confident enough to collect them now.
      Amanda xx

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  6. Lovely photos, we get some small purple fungi growing in the shade under the trees at the top of the garden sometimes, it's really pretty but i've not identified it as yet! (I recognise that place your dog is posing at in the header!) :) x

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    1. Thanks Pam, take some photos if they are still there. Twitter is a good place if you want anything ID-ing.
      Photo taken at the stocks in Guiseley.
      Amanda xx

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  7. Oh, I agree: The fungi are stunningly beautiful, terribly fun to photograph, and infinitely fascinating! I don't trust myself to eat them, though, except for one--the incredibly delicious morel! Your photos and stories are always a delight!

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    1. Thanks PP, for the lovely comment. Before you eat you really need to know what you are doing.
      Amanda xx

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  8. What a lovely post and most edifying! I can almost smell them, your images are wonderful and made me feel I need to get out and embrace Autumn too.

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    1. Thank you Jennifer for the lovely comment, so far it's been a lovely Autumn. Make sure you enjoy every moment.
      Amanda xx

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  9. A lovely collection of photos!

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