Let's look at May before we go WILD in June..



Today is the start of 30 days wild in June, most of you will be joining in and I look forward to seeing what you get up to over the next 30 days.

I am hoping to just post once a week, showing what I've been doing.


But to day I'm going to show you what I've been doing in May.


Back in April I joined a group of people looking at  Aireborough's ecology.

My plot to survey was Yeadon Banks just at the back of were |I live, I have recorded the wildlife for some year up here, but to fit the next four moths dates in with everyone else I started a fresh. Which was good as I have discovered things I previously hadn't recorded before.


Stichwort and Bluebells

Crane Fly


In April so far I have recorded.

Invertebrates-5
Wild flowers-29
Trees-8
Birds-22
Mammal-1
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May 21 was my second session on wild flowers at Denso nature reserve.

To day we were learning all about the plant families,  faced with a list of the top twenty names and a bunch of flower's we had to sort out ! not names you might be familiar with like the Rose family or the pea family, but grown up names from Chenopodiaceae to Onagraceae !!!!!



in the end I helped out quite well as I knew most of the flowers, I had a wonderful time.
 Thanks to Harry for running the flower work shop, Steve the warden, and my two flower buddies Karen and Ian.

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Blue tit

24 May was another visit to




A wonderful little reserve next to the river before you get to Ilkley, although I'm recording everything I see, my main interest is to record the wild flowers here. The Bradford Botany group has been on site and recorded most of the flowers they have found. So I have been trying to do the same from the list.

   
It's nice to discover flowers they have not recorded like this
  Changing Forget-me-not (Myosotis discolor )

Chiffchaff
Forget-me-not

Bush Vetch

Goosander (Female)

Goosander (Male)

Common Bird's-foot Trefoil 

Silverweed

Peacock Butterfly 

Robin 

Damselfly (Male azure)

it might be a small site but there is plenty to discover.

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28 April I was invited to another flower walk at Denso, a group of about twelve turned up and it was nice of Steve to introduce me as one of his flower experts including Ian and Karen.


Time of year meant there were many of the same flowers I have recorded over the past month but there was one I want to bring to your attention, I had never seen it before and would have been easily fooled into thinking it was just another flower like Cow Parsley.

Hemlock Water Dropwort: 
The Most Poisonous Plant in Britain !!
Due to the floods in winter the reserve is now covered in this plant.


Mixed in with the other plants it just blended in .

Hemlock water-dropwort (not to be confused with its equally toxic cousin hemlock (conium maculatum) is common in shallow water and wet ground throughout the UK, especially ditches,  slow-flowing streams and on foreshores. It has been mistaken for wild celery or water-parsnip – be very careful when IDing either of these for eating, or indeed any member of the carrot family. All parts of hemlock water-dropwort are potentially deadly. Look out for distinctive carrot family leaves  (3-4 times pinate at base) growing from or near water, strong unpleasant smell when broken (like acrid celery), hairless hollow grooved stem and white swollen roots.

Both foragers and dog walkers should familiarise themselves with the distinctive “dead man’s fingers” of hemlock water-dropwort roots. These are often exposed on river banks or washed up after floods or high tides. Most years they result in the deaths of several dogs around the UK after winter storms.(link)

On a nicer note I spotted a Poplar Hawk-moth hiding in the grass


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Lastly, moth trapping has been really  slow to get going, not sure why as some days the weather has been OK and conditions were good for trapping. The trap has been out more night with nothing in than what I have caught! 
This moth was found in the bathroom and not in the trap.

The Herald - Scoliopteryx libatrix



So that was May, hope June is just as fun and I wish you all well with your 30 wild days.

Hope to catch up with all your posts soon as I've still hundreds of photographs to go through !!



Comments

  1. So many folk have had close up encounters with goosander! And I haven't seen one all winter.

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    1. Thanks Simon, have to say did think of you when I saw them 😁
      Amanda xx

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  2. Hello, lovely walks and preserve. I enjoyed the wildflowers, birds, moths and the butterfly. Have a happy day and week ahead!

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    1. Thanks Eileen, been having a lovely time despite the weather..
      Amanda xx

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  3. All of those look really great events to be involved with and lovely photos too. I'm taking part in 30DW and also not planning to blog every day - it was too much trying to do that last year, plus the small matter of us going on holiday on Saturday! Looking forward to seeing what you do. x

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    1. Thanks Julie, have a lovely holiday and hope the weather is good for you. Look forward to seeing what you get to for your 30 days wild.
      Amanda xx

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  4. Great days out, paractical too. I always learn about new creatures reading your posts Amanda and although I don't have the time to take part as you do these posts always encourage me to be more vigilant in my surroundings.

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    1. Thanks Angie, for the comment, have enjoyed taking part in these events and made some friends along the way. It can take up a lot of time to record and blog about nature, so just enjoying it can be just as much fun.
      Amanda xx

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  5. Lovely pics especially the goosander.Not taki g part officially this year but i will still be enjoying the countryside through my walks x

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    1. Thanks Shazza, still love to see the Goosanders when I'm out, as I find them quite exotic. Hope you get to see some lovely things while out walking.
      Amanda xx

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  6. You've had a busy month! :) The flower workshops look great, another thing to go on my list of things to do (it gets longer and longer)! The Herald moth is quite stunning isn't it xx

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    1. Thanks Pam, so pleased I joined in on the flower course met some lovely people, they will run it again next year I'm sure. Baildon not to far to come...
      Of to Fairburns on Saturday😁
      Amanda xx

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    2. I'll keep an eye out for it! Enjoy Fairburn! :) x

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  7. Well May was so busy for you ... and I have a feeling June will be too!
    Lovely series of photo's of all the walks and wildlife.

    All the best Jan

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    1. Thanks Jan, something pencilled in for most days in June and we go on Holliday too, my poor camera is going to be worn out !!!
      Amanda xx

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  8. You have certainly found some interesting and varied things to photograph Amanda.
    If this weather keeps up then June is going to be a disaster down here, especially for the butterfly population.

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    1. Thanks Roy, for the lovely comment. Not looking good for moths as well which will have a ripple effect on many animals.
      Amanda xx

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  9. Busy, busy. May seems to always be that way for me, too. So much gardening to do after the winter and the last frost in mid-May (late for us). Now it's a rush, rush to get all the tender plants in. The flower workshop looks like it was great fun and a wonderful learning experience, too. Happy June!

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    1. Thanks PP, the weather might not have been great but the garden has transformed over the last month, I'm sure you are very busy in your wonderful garden.
      Amanda xx

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  10. A lovely and informative post with beautiful photos. You've seen so many interesting flowers and thanks for sharing the information. I didn't know hemlock had this deadly cousin and I'll look out for it now. It does sound great fun IDing flowers with other knowledgeable people. I love the moths, too. 30 days wild is a great initiative, and I look forward to seeing what you see and do for it in June.

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    1. Thanks Wendy for the lovely comment, I could have easily been caught out with this plant, and it has spread more due to the floods. Everyone has been so nice and welcoming at the Reserve (Denso) going to make some good friends.Not sure if you have moth trap, but you are in a great place to get many species.
      Amanda xx

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  11. What a wonderful May you have had Amanda - such an interesting post with beautiful photos. The wild flower course and walk both sound wonderful. Will be looking out for and avoiding Hemlock Water Dropworth!!

    Both the moths are stunning - I haven't recorded either here. I got a few more moths when I trapped a few nights back but overall numbers are exceedingly low :( In fact, there are very few insects around the garden at all with the low temperatures :(

    Look forward to reading about your #30DaysWild. Going to be a busy month!! I will post approximately once a week too - once a day is just too time consuming! Enjoy your weekend :)

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    1. Thanks RR, Weather looking good for garden blitz, have made up some wine and sugar mix to try out on the tree, some moths would be good to add to list ! Going to Fairburns nature reserve on Saturday but have got the day of work on Sunday, not planned but fell on the right day, and Monday hope to go see the Falcons at Mallam.
      Look forward to seeing what you get up to in June.
      Amanda xx

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  12. Wonderful photos. The wild flower course sounds really interesting and it is good that you discovered all about the Hemlock water-dropwort on the eildflower walk. I was thinking as I looked at the photos that its leaves look familiar, yes they do look carroty. Look forward to catching up with your 30 days wild:)

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    1. Thanks Rosie, find it fascinating a innocent looking plant can be so deadly but we eat Carrots from the same family!!!!
      Hope we all have a lovely June...
      Amanda xx

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  13. Really envious of your goosanders, they are such wonderful looking birds! Great hawkmoth, that must have been a nice surprise. You are fitting in lots of interesting things and learning so much, it's no wonder they described you as a wildflower expert! Enjoy your June as much as your May. :-) xx

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    1. Thanks Mandy, June is starting of even busier, but having a lovely time. Loving the wild flower lessons, trouble is when I get home I've forgotten it all!
      Amanda xx

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  14. I was only saying to my husband the other day what a wonderful naturalist you are. Able to spot so many different things and know all the names too - hats off to you Amanda.

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    1. Just spotted your comment, a lovely comment it is too, the secret is to do no hours work and be out side as much as possible😁😁😁
      Amanda xx

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