Friday, 15 July 2016

Are you ready Ted we're of to THE HOLY ISLAND of LINDISFARNE



But let's have lunch on the beach at Bamburgh Castle.



Once home to the kings of ancient Northumbria, Bamburgh Castle is one of Northumberland's most iconic buildings.


The sand dunes were filled with wildlife and wild flowers including Pyramid Orchid (Anacamptis pyramidalis) , Drinker Moth Caterpillar, Remains of a baby seal :( and sandy beaches as far as the eye can see.

We didn't have long here today as we were just waiting for the tide to go out on the estuary, so we could drive over to Holy Island.

Lindisfarne Castle
This is the second time I have visited Holy Island, the first time was many years ago when the boys were very little. It was March and snowing sideways ! It was so cold we walked up one street towards the Post office, not even seeing the castle or the Priory, bought a post card and went back to the car..



Today was a little warmer, and the place took my breath away, what with all the lovely houses and gardens in the village ( would be nice to see it with out so many cars). There is so much to discover and see, full of history as well as wildlife. I could spend a whole week here and be happy not to leave...

Viewing window onto the Lough

Linnet


In the North East of England,  fishermen would use redundant herring boats as storage sheds for their nets and other equipment. As the fishing industry has changed and evolved over the years the places where these traditional huts survive has diminished but Holy Island is one of the few places where they remain in abundance. There are two main sites on the island where you can see the Lindisfarne boat sheds.


In the sheltered harbour where the traditionally the boats were pulled ashore onto the beach.
 The sheds are still used by the fishermen.(link)







Castle and Harbour

Bar-Tailed Godwit 

Castle 

Red  Valerian (Centranthus ruber)




All round the coast there were beautiful flowers, one of them been Sedum's , they came in different colours and shapes, as yet I have not had the time to I.D them all, but I think this one is called  
White Stone Crop



The lime kilns at Castle Point on Holy Island are among the largest, most complex and best preserved lime kilns in Northumberland. These kilns produced quick lime for a variety of uses such agricultural fertilizer, mortar for buildings and whitewash (LINK)


Cairn

At the sea edge there was a bank of stones, how it started no one knows, but for me it was a wonderful sight.
Hundreds of visitors to the Island had contributed over the years by adding more stones, the photos don't do it justice. It felt very spiritual adding your mark at the edge of the sea.




Cairn
A cairn is a human-made pile (or stack) of stones. The word cairn comes from the Scottish Gaelic: càrn (plural càirn).Cairns have been and are used for a broad variety of purposes, from pre-historic times up to the present.







Gertrude's garden

Gertrude Jekyll (1843-1932), created some 400 gardens in the UK, Europe and America.




Gertrude's garden


The garden occupies the site of a vegetable patch which once provided the soldiers in the Castle with food. Gertrude’s combination of hardy annuals, colourful perennials and heritage vegetables provide a riot of colour in the summer and a leafy, sheltered oasis all year round.








Lindisfarne Priory

Founded by St Aidan in AD635, the site owes its fame to St Cuthbert, the greatest of Northumbrian holy men, who lived and died there.The original home to the Lindisfarne Gospels, was one of the most important centres of early Christianity in Anglo-Saxon England.



St Aidan

Statue of St Aidan designed and carved by an island resident Miss Kathleen Ophir Parbury, situated to the north side of the priory.


St Mary's Parish Church


Church of Saint Mary the Virgin' is reputed to stand on the site of the original monastery founded by Aidan in 635ad. Parts of the structure date back to the 7th century, several hundred years before the appearance of the Priory.
Whilst its main role is to serve the small Island community it is also a year-around focus for tens of thousands of visitors and pilgrims - Christian and others.




Aidan Window

West Window in memory of Mr Edward & Miss Gladys de Stein (former owners of Lindisfarne Castle)



Cuthbert Window



West Window - the Haggerston Window




"The Journey"

The Journey sculpture in elmwood by Fenwick Lawson.It shows six monks taking St. Cuthbert's body from the Island on a journey across the North during Viking raids.



The Lindisfarne Gospel Gardens

As you can tell from this longer post than normal, 
I loved it here.

One thing to note we missed a lot of things as they had closed, depending on the tide times I would go in the morning, or stay a week !



28 comments:

  1. A wonderful post Amanda with great photos. I just love it all - the island, the wild flowers, the birds, the priory, the church, the gardens, the castle. I could spend a week there too!!! :)

    Really liked the valerian photo and the "Journey" sculpture is superb. The whole place seems steeped in history with the added bonus of all that wildlife! :) Thanks so much for sharing your visit.

    Have a great weekend. Looks like hotter weather on the way so perhaps more butterflies/moths etc. around soon? :)

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    1. Thanks RR, I did think about you a lot while on the Island, I knew you would love the place, made a special effort to go in the church too..
      I so want to go back soon and spend more time here..
      Amanda xx

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  2. Hello, wow these are all awesome images. What a cool place to visit and explore. I love the birds, scenery and castle. The Journey sculpture is just amazing. Great post. Happy Friday, enjoy your weekend!

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    1. Thanks Eileen, thanks for the lovely comment, I think you to would like it here..have a lovely week
      Amanda xx

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  3. How many films and TV shows have been shot at those two castles, I wonder.

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    1. Thanks Simon, many films have been shot in Northumberland. On Sunday we had been to Berwick, that same night there was a film on called "The railway man" (Good film) with Colin Firth, filmed in Berwick and he was stood in the very same spot we were that day !!!
      Amanda xx

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  4. Oh Amanda what a wonderfully interesting post with lovely photos. I particularly like that one of the little shed - I want to live there. :)

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    1. Thanks Elaine, the little shed is so cute, going to get my own Potting shed soon and I would love it to look the same..
      Amanda xx

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  5. Lovely, what a gorgeous place, so much to see! xx

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    1. Thanks Pam, for the lovely comment.. we went to many more places during our stay, just shared a few moments..
      Amanda xx

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  6. Nice one Amanda. I have seen a lot of rare birds on the island and visit it regularly in the autumn in particular. It is known for falls of birds in spring and autumn. I saw my first Wrynecks and Bluethroats there, Yellow browed Warblers can be common, my first Red flanked Bluetail, an adult male, ws in Gertrudes Garden and one day I had a Nighjar flying up the main street in daylight! At this time, down at the Snook ( west end) are masses of orchids such as Marsh Heleborines and the endemic Lindisfarne Heleborine. I'm so glad you enjoyed it. But to get the very best of it, you need to get on the island at about 7am when the tide cuts you off at 7.30am and you are stranded til lunchtime with no tourists at all. Superb!

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    1. Thanks Stewart, after my last stay here in March I gathered there would not be as many birds about, but as I like wild flowers to it made a change to see these, gardens and houses looked lovely in the sunshine we had...
      I would love to stay when the tide has cut the people of...
      Amanda XX

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  7. Wonderful revisiting the island with you - it was one of my favourite of our days out too. We were lucky with the tide times so arrived mid-morning and didn't leave until mid-afternoon though it was still nowhere long enough. Love the photo of the anchor and huts. Not surprisingly I photographed the huts too but there was a guy taking photos of the anchor and wasn't for moving so I couldn't get near :( Glad you managed some birds too as we didn't see anything of note - too many people probably. Love your photo of St Aidan - you caught the light perfectly. Hoping to post my photos soon but I've not got around to loading them up yet! x

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    1. Thanks Julie,
      the huts were one of the things I wanted to see, reading up about them there were 16 in the harbour, then someone set fire to them !!!! Wrong time of year for birds apart from sea birds on the Farne Islands.
      Look forward to seeing your photos...
      Amanda xx

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  8. Wonderful! I've really enjoyed all your photos and information about Lindisfarne, I've never been over to it although we have got as close as Bamburgh and Seahouses:)

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    1. Thanks Rosie, you would love it here as you to are interested in history.. I would go in the summer months if you get chance as its a very cold place in winter...
      Amanda xx

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  9. What a wonderful way to show the area.Such gorgeous pictures.Makes me want to go immediately! Saw lots of red valarian at Grange and Silverdale.Really want some for my back yard now.:)

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    1. Thanks Shazza for the lovely comment, go back and collect the seeds at the end of flowering, Fluffy seeds blow round like thistle seeds, and just them loose in you your garden. The moths and butterflies love them...
      Amanda xx

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  10. A wonderful visit! So lovely to come along with you in this way. Your photos are very beautiful - and so obviously is the island!

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  11. It's such a lovely place. I've been once and loved every minute. Great set of photos, as always x

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  12. Oh, I so enjoyed this post Amanda.
    Many thanks for giving us the detail/history too ... appreciated.

    All the best Jan

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  13. A superb post, Amanda, and like you, my first ever visit was under chilly conditions. I have been back since in various weathers - such a special place, and never enough time to do, see and 'be'! There were so many insects in Gertrude's garden last time we were there - and I can almost hear those curlews now, calling across Budle Bay, on round the point and over the causeway. I would love to have seen the Lindisfarne Gospels exhibition in Durham some years back - such important and magnificent handiwork.

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  14. Really interesting post and what a wonderful place. I really liked Gertrude Jekyll's little garden there! You did better than me with the bird photos!! Loved the cairns too, how great to be able to add a bit of history to the place. xx

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  15. A very interesting place Amanda, thanks for the tour.
    Never seen so many Red Valerian.

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  17. Gertrude's garden is impressive! The whole place is magical, and that hillside full of Red Valerian ... wow!

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  18. Hi Amanda, I have just found your blog and loved reading this post as we have just returned from a short camping trip in Northumberland. We didn't have time to visit Lindisfarne only catching glimpses of it on the horizon from Bamburgh and I would have loved Gertrude's garden too!

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  19. Hi Amanda and apologies for the very, very late comment :-) What an enjoyable post of what is one of the more beautiful corners of Northumberland, you certainly saw plenty to enjoy and admire, whilst your enthusiasm for the location really comes across through your writing. The gardens are beautiful, the bank of Valerian especially, but it is the birds and wildflowers which I enjoyed the most. The remains of the dead seal, whilst sad of course, was also very interesting to see.

    Hope you are well and my kindest regards :-)

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