Standing in Titus Salt Conservatory.....





Titus Salt

Some of you will have heard of a man called Titus Salts, and some will have visited the mill at Saltaire.

But to day we were going to Milner Field.
  Milner Field was a large mansion set within its own parkland grounds on the northern slope of the Aire valley one mile to the north west of the mill and model village of Saltaire Nr Shipley in West Yorkshire, England. 

We parked at the end of Coach road and walking up through the grounds of Milner fields, the first thing you notice is all the Holly trees, it turns out Titus was a collector of Holly trees and his agents brought back specimens from abroad.


Just before you get to the top of the hill, look to your left and you can see some stones scattered in the wood. This is the best time to go before the trees and plants take over.
The house is well gone but there is still evidence of the house and you can see the underground sellers.





The house had been very grand.

 Built in 1873 in the (then fashionable) neo-Gothic style, with a nod in the direction of the Arts and Crafts movement, it had its own water and electricity supplies, sewage system and filter beds, water-cooled storage rooms (the forerunner of refrigerators!) and was connected by telephone to the mill in Saltaire. It had splendid facilities to cater for the family's recreational needs - a huge billiard room with pre-Raphaelite stained glass and murals, a magnificent library, a music room with a massive purpose-built pipe organ, and stables. It also had landscaped gardens and a large 'winter garden' conservatory and glasshouse, with a mosaic floor, housing palms, orchids and a variety of tropical fruits
(text borrowed from - Saltaire Daily Photo)


The new Milner Field.
(LINK)
I had gone especially to see the tiled floor of the conservatory.
The walk way is through the Orangery

Milner Field Orangery.
(LINK)


Edging tiles



the tiles in the middle of the conservatory would have been a grand flower design.





Stone work from the house is scattered all over the area.

We think these steps would have led up to the entrance court.

(LINK)



























We found this large tree with a very big Burl.



At the top of Higher Coach Rd is the Manor House (of Primrose Ln Bingley)

Through the trees you can see the wall of the walled garden.





The remains of this extensive collection of buildings and glasshouses still exists (although now in a ruinous and dangerous condition)
(LINK)

The fruit pegs are still in the wall and the Hawthorn trees are still showing how they were forced (Espalier) to grow.






We followed more paths covered in moss


Up and down we went with much more to explore on another day.






through a gate



pass the Geese, we ended up back at the car....


We had a wonderful time discovering new things....
and we will be going back soon.

******What have you discovered this weekend******

Happy Hunting
AMANDA XXX

Sir Titus Salt
saltaire Sir Titus Salt lived from 1803 to 1876.

He was a good employer and built a new mill on the outskirts of the town of Bradford, where the air was fresh, and working conditions would be more pleasant for his workers.


It was a massive mill with space, light and warmth in his new mill. The location was superb, in a green and pleasant area and the Mill opened in 1853 on Titus Salts 50th birthday.


Titus Salt created an entire village of houses, park, school, library, recreation and learning institute and outdoor sport facilities around the mill naming the streets after his children and family. 


In 1869 he was created a baronet by Queen Victoria, thus becoming Sir Titus Salt. 


In 1876 the last building in Saltaire was completed, and later that year Sir Titus Salt died at his home. 


Bradford gave him a civic funeral, watched by 100,000 people., 





Comments

  1. Hi Amanda, I loved this post. So interesting to wander in the ruins of Titus's home. Thank you for sharing all the interesting photos and links.
    Jacquie x

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    1. Thanks Jacqie, we have had a wonderful day to day learning about Titus, I would have loved to see the house when it was all there...
      Amanda xx

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  2. It breaks my heart to see a house in ruins, or the aftermath of the decay, however I loved your post showing what had been there and the vastness of such an enormous place. It's a place I would love to explore! Thank you. Chel x

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    1. Thanks Chel, its sad as it must have been a very grand house in its day....
      Amanda xx

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  3. Thank you for sharing this fascinating place, so interesting and also sad that it's ruined. x

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    1. Thank you, still talking about it to day, my parents are over for mothers day and have said they would like to go next time we go.
      Amanda xx

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  4. Really interesting. I love pottering aound old ruins and imagining how it might have been - reminds me of our trip to Rivington terraced gardens last year where we also found old tiled floors. So many beautiful places which have been lost but now have a different kind of beauty. x

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    1. Thanks Julie, we had not read much about the place before we went, so it was fun trying to work out what everything was, especially some of the older buildings. Had a great time, going to look for some more forgotten places to explore.
      Amanda xx

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  5. Great post! I now have a new place on my ever-growing list of places I want to visit! Like the mosaic floors and the pegs still in place for training fruit trees - I wonder if there were heated walls for e.g. peaches? (In one of your photos it looks as if there is a chimney and a furnace/boiler house.) I discovered a ruined mansion on holiday in Anglesey a few years ago and spent many an hour (and repeated visits) trying to figure out what was there. Thanks for sharing..

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    1. Thanks Leafencounter, there were five small buildings at the back of the walled garden, so it is possible peaches were grown, some of the heat might have fed the large greenhouse that we're there to. Exotic fruit and veg was grown all year round. We will defiantly be going back. It's a very special place , mainly known by local people. Worth a visit.
      Amanda xx

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  6. A lovely and really interesting post with some great photos. Its so sad the house is now in ruins - the floor in the conservatory looks beautiful. Love the moss photo - it looks as though there is loads to explore on a future visit.

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    1. Thanks RR, thought you would like this one, has sparked a real interest with me and hubby. Taking mum and dad in a few weeks so will call at Salts mill and get the book on the place. It would be good if they could save some part of the tiled floor and have it on display at the mill.
      Amanda xx

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  7. Where is Time Team when you need them! That mosaic floor is fabulous, looks like something Roman. :-) Shame it has just gone to rack and ruin. I love how the trees adapt though and manage to grow sitting on top of the bricks, that's quite something. Interesting places. xx

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    1. Thanks Mandy, you are right it would make a great program, from what I've read a lot of bad things happened to the family's that lived there, that's why it was pulled down eventually as they could not sell it. Nature is taking over once more, but it would be nice to save the tiled floor.
      Amanda xx

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  8. It's a great heritage site, would love to have a good exploration of the cellars...but not too far in!

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    1. Thanks Simon, hubby did say he would like to look further in them, when we read up about them later we found out they had run the whole length of the underside of the house..
      Amanda xx

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  9. Wow, look at all that moss! What a wonderful place, and thanks for the tour. If I'm ever in Yorkshire, I'll add it to my "must see" list. Thanks!

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    1. Thanks PP, get used to seeing moss as we live in a very wet and damp area, glad you liked the post.
      Amanda xx

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  10. It looks an interesting site, sad it's all in ruins though.

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    1. Thanks CT, Plenty of woodland birds about too, will look for wild flowers and any unusual trees that have been left over from the gardens..
      Amanda xx

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  11. Hi Amanda, I think the weather looks ok for your visit to Beadnell. It might be a bit breezy but it looks fair. I'll look forward to seeing the photos you take...

    Stewart...

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    1. Thanks Stewart, fingers crossed for lots of birds too..
      Amanda xx

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  12. What a stunningly beautiful place.....I love the moss and hidden paths and bricks. I could get lost in a place like that.
    Some of the tree roots are works of art alone.....


    Thanks for sharing.........magical

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    1. Thanks Cheryl, going back soon, has got me interested in visiting more places this year..
      Amanda xx

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  13. What a beautiful house, it's such a shame it's all in ruins. I'd still love to have a look around though. Thanks for sharing. :-)

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    1. Thanks Deb, hoping to get the book on my next visit to the mill, so I can read more about this man and his great house.
      Amanda xx

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  14. Great to see the remants and traesires of such a lovely house. Like treasure hunting for the visitor. If the house was still standing and it good condition it looks as if it would be amazing. I love the arts & crafts period. I keep meaning to go to William Morris' Red House not to far from here.

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    1. Thanks Katharine, we were all talking about it for weeks after, how amazing it would be to visit if it was still standing, has got me interested in visiting more places like this...
      Amanda xx

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