Seahouses..part two.




Last post of our trip to Northumberland 

NORTHSUNDERLAND / SEAHOUSES to give the village its full title, is remembered so well as a fishing village. Alas, very little is left of that illustrious heritage of the 1800's and the village now thrives under a new veil uniquely known as "TOURISM". Initially the harbour was used for the shipment of considerable quantities of corn. Indeed during the summer of 1846 over 1000 tons of corn was shipped out. During the 1770's the quarrying of limestone and subsequent burning in the still evident lime kilns was an important industry. The quicklime was cargoed to Scotland mainly for fertiliser. The closing of the draw kilns in 1860 coincided with the upsurge of the fishing with which Seahouses is perhaps best known - Herring was king! This atmospheric period of Seahouses life brought all the wonderful innovations associated with its development. An enlarged harbour a huge visiting herring fleet, 10 herring yards, a railway to carry the herring, Woodgers kippers, even the two world wars didn't spoil the 'local' feel of Seahouses. The demise of the herring and other fishings altered the old world 'feel' of the village, but the ever resourceful inhabitants have adapted the situation to cater for the holiday maker and day tripper alike. Sea trips to the Farne Islands still provide the visitor a chance to imagine Seahouses and its historic past.


Just before the harbour the rocks have a small colony of sea birds nesting.

Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis)


   Kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla)


Carr End, Seahouses
Stone building used for storing gunpowder in the late 19th century.



The Eider ducks were about in good numbers, this is the bird that first started me down the road of bird watching when I saw them for the first time here on holiday in 2009.

They have the most wonderful call, you can listen to them here on the RSPB web page.



They even came out of the water , hoping to be fed.


Another bird in the harbour, new to me were
 Purple Sandpiper (Calidris maritima)



Small flocks of Turnstone (Arenaria interpres) were feeding on the water edge.





Seahouses’ fishing past lives on at Swallow Fish, who operate the UK’s oldest operating smokehouses.






Singing in the sun was a Starling.




From Seahouses you could walk along the beach to Bamburgh Castle.




In the town of Seahouses there is this one shop you must visit, when the boy's were younger we went in this shop a lot, it's full of the most wonderful tat...!
I was so happy it was still open and running.


That's it folk's....

Hope you liked the photos from Northumberland.

HAPPY HUNTING

AMANDA XX

Comments

  1. Hi Amanda,
    Been to Bamburgh castle a few years ago but I left a tad disappointed, I guess I'm too used to the 'Iron Fist' of medieval castles here in N. Wales. Your pictures though are certainly not disappointing m'dear and the Eider and Fulmers are birds I'd love to see close up so thank you for these, but my favorite is your picture of the lowly Starling, people don't realise when beautiful colors they have..rather like a patch of oil over dark water, stunning.
    John

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    1. Thanks John, you are right Wales has some great Castles, but I like Northumberland for it's long open beaches, I also like Wales for it's hills it would be hard to choose...
      I am loving the Starling at the moment there colouring is beautiful..
      Amanda xx

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  2. Your camera work is amazing Amanda. I have been studying some of the images, your composition and detail are wonderful.
    I have never visited Northumberland, I know it is said to be beautiful and your photographs have confirmed this.
    I really must visit this area.............

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    1. Thanks Cheryl, loving the new camera, seeing things in more detail is great. And yes you must visit Northumberland if you get the chance, we have al ways gone early in the year when it's quiet.
      Amanda xx

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  3. Hi Amanda, I'm not sure if you know about it but in your shot of Bamburgh castle there is a house in the dunes. That is Monk's House, in the 50s it was a bird observatory run by the fantastic artist Eric Ennion, one of my heros. If you ever get a chance to find one, his book 'The House on the Shore' is one of my all time favourites describing his time at Seahouses. Google Eric Ennion and the house on the shore, I would have loved to have been there!

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    1. Thanks Stewart, I was not aware of Monk's House before, so thanks for that I will look it up.
      Amanda xx

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  4. Eider ducks are great, aren't they? When you first hear them,it's quite surreal, an unexpected noise for a bird to be making - very Frankie Howard!!

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    1. Thanks , a wonderful bird we could have sat there for ages just listening to their call.
      Amanda xx

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  5. Beautiful photos, Amanda. I especially like the starling (which looks like it's having a stretch)!

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    1. Thanks Tim, the Starling was having a good sing...
      Amanda xx

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  6. Northumberland is part od the country I really don't know. Thanks for the virtual tour via your blog. Amazing photos. You must have a good camera.

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    1. Thank you for visiting Katharine, and I am glad you like the photos from Northumberland, it's a place you must visit if you get the chance. I am using a Nikon bridge camera, nothing to fancy..
      Amanda xx

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  7. Exceptional photos of an area I would love to return to not only because of family connections but because it's a coast that's rich in history and natural beauty.

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    1. Thanks Linda, once you have been Northumberland it grabs hold of you and keeps pulling you back....
      Amanda xx

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  8. Beautiful photos Amanda with some amazing compositions :) Adore the Eider photos - I've only ever seen this species once - Walney Island I think it was in Cumbria. Looks a really beautiful area to visit - its moved even higher up my wish list of holiday destinations now :)

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  9. I know you're as interested as me in wildlife in churchyards - I meant to mention in my earlier comment about a new book on "God's Acre" that I heard about today. Its only £4.99 plus pandp so will let you know when it arrives if its worth buying.

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    1. Thanks RR, Northumberland should be on your bucket list of places to go, it's hard as we have a lot of beautiful places in England that need visiting.

      I have that book, I thought you had too,if it's the same one by Francesca Greenoak, if you have not seen it before you are going to love it...
      Amanda xx

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    2. Hi Amanda - Yes, I have the Francesca Greenoak book - its beautiful and one of my favourites. This is a new one that has just been published based on questionnaires etc. of wildlife in churchyards.

      Yes, must go to Northumberland - looks very quiet and peaceful up there :)

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  10. Glorious photos as always, especially the Eider. I've been to Seahouses, fantastic place, and as for the Kittiwakes.... xx

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    1. Thanks CT, the Kittiwakes were been all lovie dovie with each other, it was nice to watch.
      Amanda xx

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  11. Lovely images Amanda.
    The Fulmars are real characters to watch and those Eider are wonderful colours.
    I have only seen them once in Scotland. The green colour (almost unreal) really stands out.

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    1. Thanks Roy, it was nice to see all the birds but I had gone especially to see the Eider duck....
      Amanda xx

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  12. What a place! Amazing photos.
    Amalia
    xo

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