I'm following a tree

.........March.......

   



This time last year some of  the Larch trees were in flower,
 it has been a colder winter so we are running a little behind,

6/3/15

 a few more weeks and things will get moving.
You can just see the buds starting to form.





Nothing much has changed, so I have been looking at the few other Larch trees we have in the park. 

The plot were mine is (a) there are eight trees mixed in with the Pine. Another tree (b) is hidden amongst the tree line boarder on the same plot of land, with a young tree further down.
Further into park , a area which divides the two parks Kirk Lane Park and Nunroyd Park, is another group of mixed Larch and Pine.(c)



My tree


As far as I can tell my tree is a European larch or common Larch,
But this particular tree has many miss shaped or deformed cones.


Were two cones have grown out of the end, or they have turned fat and heart shaped.






The under side of the bark has a red tinge to it.


And the outer is rough and scaly, covered in small amounts of Lichen.





There are many types of Larch Tree.

 Dahurian,Dunkeld, European, Golden, Japanese, Polish, Russian, Siberian,Skkim, and Western.


Tree c

Tree B

Tree B and Tree C

 are a  totally different shape to mine , with strong branches not draping downwards like my tree.

In my Collins Tree guide these two trees look like 
Japanese or Dunkeld Larch. The scales on the cones curve outward slightly, I might be able to tell more when the flowers come.

Nature 
On my tree the two Harlequin Ladybirds are present and come out  to feed when the sun is shining, I carefully removed them to photograph then put them back.


On tree B
 the cones have been eaten probable by Squirrels and the cones on the ground were covered in moss.



I'd brought home a very small spider..


I will leave you with a hint of what's to come.......
taken last year.



HAPPY HUNTING

AMANDA XXX

Comments

  1. lovely shots Amanda....have to visit my tree and get a post up after the grind
    John

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    1. Thanks John, this is another project I enjoy doing.
      Amanda xx

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  2. Oh, how lovely. This is probably the best "tree following" post I've ever seen! The presentation and all the information really help us to learn about the Larch tree intimately. Thank you.

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    1. Thanks PP, what a nice comment, still a lot to learn about this tree, the more I look the more I find !
      Amanda xx

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  3. I thought maybe your tree was a Dunkeld (ie hybrid between Japanese and European) as the branches droop down and then sweep upwards - or could it have some weeping larch in it? There is a larch here, on the edge of a little planting surrounding the sewage works, that has similar languid branches, making it look rather sickly. I wonder if it is just smothered by some of the other trees.

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    1. Thanks Jennifer, I did wonder about the I.D of my tree as it is different to the others I have found. The group of trees that my tree is in have the same draping branches but my tree has slightly odd cones to the others. they are fighting for space with the Pine trees, I did put it on Ispot last year and some one said it was European, but they have been wrong in the past.
      There is nothing straight forward in nature..!
      Amanda xx

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  4. Fantastic pictures and I love the flowers. I have found a larch in the woods where I walk the dogs so will be keeping an eye on it as the season progresses. Can't believe you had snow yesterday! Bright sunshine here. PS- the map was great too xx

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    1. Thanks CT, you must look out for the flowers when they come through, I think they are often missed which is a shame as they are beautiful. The snow was Monday and it came down in big super flakes, think we have a whole years weather in one week, as is doors open and sunny to day :)
      Amanda xx

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  5. Thank you, Amanda, for your kind comment - and, yes, do start recording the ladybirds. Dr Helen Roy and her team do fabulous work on the survey (here). I am so pleased you are doing a larch, which is the tree I followed in a previous tree meme. They are such graceful trees. And - actually - since your Ladybirds are Harlequins, take a look at this form here ...

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    1. Thanks Caroline, I had seen the work they were doing last year and you have just reminded me to look at the Harlequins I find to see if they have got this fungi.
      Amanda xx

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  6. A really interesting post Amanda with some great photos. You've picked a really fascinating tree :) The flowers are beautiful - look forward to seeing this years. Hope the weather is better for you this weekend than yesterday!

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    1. Thanks RR, We are having wonderful weather and managed to get my first Snipe this morning so pleased. Glad you like the tree.
      Amanda xx

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  7. A really interesting post and lovely photos.

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    1. Thanks Deb, a interesting tree to follow, still full of surprises.
      Amanda xx

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  8. A really interesting post and lovely photos.

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  9. So informative and the photos are amazing.

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    1. Thanks Jacqui, hope you are well. Flowers should be out next moth, hope the weather is good with you.
      Amanda xx

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  10. Very interesting. Love the Ladybirds, too!
    Have a wonderful day!
    Lea

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    1. Thanks Lea, glad you like the tree, the Ladybirds are actually Harlequins, sadly they are not doing our native Ladybirds any good at all..
      Amanda xx

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  12. Amanda, I don't think you need to record on iSpot AND the ladybird surveys - either/or, since they are linked. I always did the former until I was sent a message with link to use on iSpot, so now I use that. Thank you for visitng my tree post!

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    1. Thanks for getting back to me Caroline, that has helped.
      Amanda xx

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  13. Whoops ... that should read 'visiting'!

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  14. It is amazing to see so many wonderful details of the trees!!! Your pictures and explanations are wonderful and so interesting! xx

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    1. Thanks Amy, glad you like the post on my tree..
      Amanda xx

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  15. again -- beautiful photos, I really like the format of the close ups. I'd be interested in knowing how it's done.

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    1. Thanks Hollis, I have just got some photos together to do a post on my close -up photos, all I have done is made a light box, plenty of ideas on Pinterest of YouTube but I will be doing a post next week if you want to pop back.
      Amanda xx

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    2. Great! I will have a look for sure. Will it be on your Quiet Walker blog?

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    3. Yes Hollis I will be putting here on the quiet walker.
      Amanda xx

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  16. A mega post with fantastic (and artistic!) photographs. I was interested too to read your exchange with Caroline. I hadn't realised that by putting ladybirds on iSpot one is, as it were, killing two birds with one stone. (Though that may not be the best metaphor to use on a nature blog - especially when Caroline is around!)
    And . . . I'm wondering . . . how did you put the text in your photographs? I don't usually like text superimposed on pictures but this is 'just right'. If it's a programme accessible on line I might well follow your example. (If not, I will stick with admiring.)

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    1. Thanks Lucy, it's interesting that iSpot are taking Ladybird records, after recording one I would not have thought to put other sightings on this sight.
      The text is done on PicMonkey , on line Photoshop. I just love using it and it's free to use for most of it, Once you get the hang of it you will wonder how you ever managed before, only thing is I spend far to long messing about with my photos, a blog post can take up to four hours to finish.
      Amanda xx

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  17. What a very different way to follow your tree - it's amazing what a bit of imagination can do. Something I obviously lack :) Amazing photography. I can see a wood of Larch trees from my back door and they look very much like the one you have labelled Tree B.
    Your name caught my attention - I have a work colleague with the same name.

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    1. Thanks Angie, glad you like my post, keep a eye on the Larch wood, when they come into flower we might be able to find out there I.D. This is not a easy task as many trees are hybrid plants. As I'm finding out, my tree might not be a common Larch after all....
      Amanda xx

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  18. I was thinking of you while I was walking through the woods yesterday and realising I hadn't got a clue what the trees were! I'll have to take my tree book when they're in leaf to see if I can identify some. I'd love there to be a larch based on the last photo. x

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    1. Thanks Julie, trying to I.D trees can be a lot of fun as well as frustrating as there are more about than you think, many of the same species. Now is a good time to start though with the blossom on it's way, it helps a lot.
      Amanda xx

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  19. GREAT post! I love the way you laid it out with the frames, etc. Your tree is beautiful and the cones are absolutely fascinating. I look forward to seeing how far along it will be next month. Thanks for sharing in such an imaginative way!

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    1. Thanks Anna glad you like my post, I do like to try new ideas when posting my photos..
      Amanda xx

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