Cannibalism in the mud and Dipper day

*****UPDATE**** 8/2/15***

Had waited to post the ID of the "Earwig" as I did not think after looking at the photos it was one. 
So posted the photos on Ispot, have had many views but one person has come back saying it might be a ground beetle larvae, I think it looks like a Carabid beetle larvae.


On Nature Spot it says this about them...


Whilst most adult Carabidae (ground beetles) are readily identifiable, the larval 

stage is not well documented and even with a specimen available, it is unlikely 

that you would find an expert with the skills and reference materials to identify 

it to species level. Our aim therefore is to illustrate Carabidae larvae just to 

inform users of the general appearance. 


I will leave the notes in for Earwig as you can read about them too


This morning my hubby found this worm and (Carabid beetle larvae)  having a battle, 
the larvae had attached it's self to the tip of the worm and was trying to bite it's way through the worm.


The worm tried to escape down the cracks of the flags, but the  larvae still managed to hold on and eventually nipped the end of the worm off.




You can see the end of the worm in the larvae pincers.

(.....Earwigs are generally nocturnal, and seek out dark cracks and crevices to rest during the day. They are mainly vegetarian scavengers, but will eat carrion and other insects.

Although they have wings, earwigs are usually reluctant to fly. Unlike most insects, a female earwig is a good mother. She lays 20-30 eggs and protects them through the winter. When they hatch, she feeds and tends the nymphs until they are able to fend for themselves.....)



To day we were visiting my family in Settle, but first we called at Hellifield Flash, this is a good place to see water birds. the weather here was low and the light was very flat , not good for taking photos, but well worth a visit.


Lapwing (25)


On the water there was a large flock of Lapwings and Mallards,Pochard,Wigeon and Shelducks.



The River Ribble, runs round the edge of  Settle, and when we were kids living at Langcliffe the river was just over our garden wall, the section that runs past Settle high school is a good spot for Dippers.
Three were seen to day., We watched them swimming in the river and  feeding.

Dipper (26)



On the river there was two Oystercatchers, they are quite common on the river now.

Oystercatcher (27)


Happy Hunting

AMANDA XXX



Comments

  1. Brilliant Dipper shots Amanda and the scenic image just above it.

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    1. Thanks Roy, had to add a bit of colour to Dipper shots as the light was not good to day, they are great to watch swimming in the river.
      Amanda xx

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  2. What an amazing event to witness, the earwig, and great images. I was always afraid of earwigs (thinking they burrowed into your ears and ate your brain), but rather like them now, being good mothers, and they like stone too (for its cool and damp). I don't think you see as many around now. Wonderful Dipper shots too.

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  3. Thanks Jennifer, I'm not to keen on them as well, as a child they looked much bigger, and I also thought they would get in my ears.
    Amanda xx

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  4. Superb pictures. Amazing shots of the earwig and worm. I didn't know they had wings. I also loved the pic of the river just above the Dipper- what fabulous birds they are. I've only ever seen one before near an ancient bridge on Dartmoor. It caused huge excitement xx

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    1. Thanks CT, have put the photo of the "Earwig" on Ispot as not sure it'e one, quite a few people have had a look and one person has come back saying it could be a Carabid beetle larvae, will get JJ to have a look...keep you posted.
      Amanda xx

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  5. I had never heard of a earwig (maybe that's a good thing!) they look a little scary. Your photos are beautiful, especially liked the framed scenic view!

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    1. Thanks Juliet, turns out it is not a Earwig, but a ground beetle larvae, quite hard to ID, but still as unpleasant as a Earwig to look at, Earwigs are good mothers though...
      Amanda xx

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  6. Great photos Amanda especially of the Dipper - I haven't seen one for a few years. Loved the carabid beetle larva and earthworm sequence (fascinating) - your macro facility looks very good :)

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    1. Thanks RR, they do quite well on this river , but still nice to see. I love watching them diving down to feed and swim about in the river.
      Amanda xx

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  7. Very interesting with the beetle larvae and the worm! Also I'm dead envious of your Dippers and the great shots. I haven't seen any for years, but finally saw some Lapwings today. Was beginning to wonder what was wrong as they are often on ploughed fields along with seagulls here. xx

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    1. Thanks Mandy, it was interesting to watch the worm and B Larvae, thankfully the worm was OK. Dipper one of my favourite birds, and I have seen good numbers of Lapwings over the past few days.
      Amanda xx

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  8. Wow, I have never seen anything like the earwig/worm battle! Amazing pictures! xx

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  9. Wow! Talk about David and Goliath! Seems a battle that the worm was destined to escape from based on size but I know these larvae are ferocious predators. Anyhow, fascinating to witness.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks JJ, going to keep one eye on the floor from now on...
      Amanda xx

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