Summer meadow..


To day I wanted to catch up on my wild flowers, 
It was not till I got home that I realised I had gone on the very exact day 29th June a year ago !

There were many last year I could not name, but with the help of iSpot I have been going through my list of NEED TO I.D (it's a long list)
Like all things in nature your first few discovery's are easy to name then you dig a little deeper and find that Yellow flower looks like ten other Yellow flower !
For that very reason they are having the same trouble on iSpot, 
Yesterday 3 people named this flower as Hoary Ragwort 
and to day 2 people say it's  Marsh Ragwort.


Marsh Ragwort (Senecio aquaticus)


 This next "yellow flower" from the Daisy family looks like all the other ones too..


Common Catsear  (Hypochaeris radicate)



Hopefully Iv'e managed to name the rest right, if not let me know..




This is the little Beck that runs through the field and ends up running through the Park were most of my time is spent.

Along here good numbers of bog loving plants can be found.



The meadow looked stunning in the sun


Garden Grass-veneer (Chrysoteuchia culmella) (1/7/14)


As I walked through the grass I was disturbing many moths and insects, the Swifts were loving this, how they managed to get so close without hitting me, I don't know but it was simply 
amazing..



There was good number of Meadow Browns





And lots of these flies which I think are Snipe Fly's, 
a stunning fly close up.




There were masses of  Meadow Vetchling which is good for all the Butterflies


Peacock Caterpillars





But this is the main reason I had gone to day, last year this plant..
Common Valerian (Veleriana officinals)
was one of my favourite flowers and it just reminds me of hot sunny days.




They have grown well this year, this area is also a good place for Skippers..
just managed to see the one



Back over the Beck I stopped to admire the Foxgloves




Happy Hunting
Amanda xxx

Comments

  1. What a beautiful place to spend time and so many lovely flowers to admire. Your mystery micro moth is Chrysoteuchia culmella I think (but they are notoriously difficult to ID with confidence). Lovely shots of the Meadow Browns- they are having a fantastic year here, I saw 40 as I walked down the lane with the dogs a couple of days back, and over 80 when I did a transect on some chalk downland last week :-)

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    1. Thanks CT, have just relished I'm getting my Meadow Browns and Ringlets mixed up ! The two photos I have are Meadow's.(right?)
      Amanda xx

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    2. Yup, yours are Meadows :-) Ringlets have two circles on the top and bottom wings and no hint of light brown with the wings open. When the wings are closed the circles are even more apparent and have white edging and a white dot in the centre. There are usually 5 on the lower wing grouped as 3 and 2, and 3 on the top wing. It's easy to confuse female meadow browns with ringlets as they are both rich brown in colour. The flight is slightly different though- I always think ringlets are choppier when they fly :-)

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    3. Hi CT, just to let you know you were right with your I.D of the little moth found in the wild flower meadow, It was a Garden Grass-veneer (Chrysoteuchia culmella), thanks...
      Amanda xx

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  2. The wild flowers are glorious this year, aren't they. I've seen lots of Meadow Browns too! As always your wild life posts make me want to go out and look.
    Jacqui

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    1. Hi Jacqui, everywhere is looking beautiful at the moment,still green and fresh. We are in July.. How did that happen ? Make the most of it now.
      Amanda xxx

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  3. I'm so glad you posted this as I've just realised that for years I've been calling the yellow flowered weed that is all over my lawn Hawkbit, only to find it is in fact the Common Catsear that you posted!! Well now I know, but isn't it hard, cos the flowers look identical!
    Lovely lot of wildflowers and your countryside is gorgeous. :-)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Mandy, if you look in a flower book this flower looks like 10 other yellow flowers, they don't often show the leaves at the bottom, they grow at the base of the stem and not up the plant, It can be spelt like this as well "Cat's-ear" which I like better I think.
      Having said all this it still would not surprise me if someone said I had got the I.D wrong for this yellow flower.
      Amanda xx

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    2. I have the Collins pocket guide to Wildflowers of Britain and Northern Europe, and looking in that book (prob where I got the ID in the first place) my plant still looks much more like Lesser or Rough Hawkbit than Catsears in their drawings! This is where the internet comes in so handy because we need to compare with loads of photos! But I haven't time for much flower ID as the bugs keep me too busy. :-)

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  4. A lovely post with some beautiful photos - the meadow looks just wonderful. I struggle with the hawkbits and Cat's-ear type flowers - so many look the same :( Although that applies to quite a few other groups too!! Micro moths are really difficult to id - so many (like the yellow daisy type flowers!! ) look the same. But its fun to try and solve the id challenge and we are all learning so much all the time.

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    1. Thank you , think I will have to live with the fact I will not get all the I.D right even with the help of books and iSpot, even the same plant can look different, depending on its environment. I suppose that's what makes it all so fascinating.
      Amanda xx

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