One place...evening



One evening

It's been soooo hot...

Decided to take a late walk up into the fields near were we live, have been noticing flowers I missed last year and in late Summer it is good for Butterflies due to the good amount of Thistles.

Mentha aquatica


Water Mint found for the first time down by the Beck. There is only about three plans, as long as the horses don't eat them I'm  hoping we will have a few more next year.

Water mint is the commonest of all the mint species in the British Isles, growing in almost any watery or damp place.Many hybrids such as peppermint have water mint as one of their parents.


Another first was this spiders nest, with all the young spiders coming out of the sack. Not been able to get a  I.D, they could be Crab or Grass spiders.


Narrow-Bordered Five-Spot Burnet (Zygaena lonicerae)

First of all I put this on Ispot, it came back as Narrow-Bordered Five-Spot Burnet,
 according to Butterfly Conservation they said

Very similar to and sometimes difficult to distinguish from the Five-spot Burnet. In general, the forewing of the Narrow-bordered Five-spot Burnet is longer and more pointed, the upper angle of the hindwing is more pointed and the black border of the hindwing is narrower than those of the Five-spot Burnet. Sometimes, although infrequently, the red colour is replaced by yellow.

Identification can be very hard some times with anything from the natural world, there are many variations in just one species, books photographs and drawings can look different even when it's the same subject.
The internet can help or make it worse, once you have put a name to a photo it will come up even if its wrong.


Tufted vetch (Vicia cracca)
(tufted vetch, cow vetch, bird vetch, boreal vetch)

Cow Vetch is also much appreciated by bees and butterflies as a source of nectar. Some of the moths that benefit from Tufted vetch are, Light grey shade moth, Flax tortrix moth, Blackneck moth and Burnet moth


Meadow vetchling (Lathyrus pratensis)

Masses of Meadow vetchling (Lathyrus pratensis), farmers encourage this slender, scrambling plant to grow in their meadows, since the nodules on its roots fix nitrogen from the air and so increase the richness of soil.
Pea moth, wood white butterfly,and Burnet moth benefit from Meadow vetchling.




Ringlet (Aphantopus hyperantus)

This is a common butterfly, the rings on the hind-wings give this butterfly its common name, closely related to the Meadow brown. The dark colouring allows this butterfly to warm up quickly. A Ringlet is one of the few that flies on a dull day.

Creeping Tormentil (Potentilla reptans)

This is another plant for me why keeping good records is essential, (I do like to be organised) have seen it about for years but not actually recorded it down.
Tormentil flowers almost always, bear four petals. The smaller, but closely related creeping Tormentil   (Potentilla reptans), normally has five petals, although a small proportion of them-approximately  one in five- have six petals.
 Mullein Wave and Lunar Yellow Underwing are just two of the moths that benefit from this plant. 


Ponies are often kept in this field across the Beck.


Yarrow (Achillea millef

Yarrow is considered an especially useful companion plant, repelling some insects pests while attracting good, predatory ones. It attracts predatory wasps, which drink the nectar and then use insect pests as food for their larvae. Similary, it attracts Ladybirds and Hoverflies.


The sun was setting so time for home,
post coming soon of same place during the day

Thanks for the information:
 http://butterfly-conservation.org/
Readers Digest/ Wild flowers of Britain
Wikipedia

Happy Hunting
Amanda


Comments

  1. I believe narrow-bordered 5 spots are more prevalent than 5 spots (certainly down here). It is confusing and sometimes even the experts seem to disagree! Great post- lots of useful information and some lovely clear pictures too xx

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    Replies
    1. Thanks CT, didn't know much about this moth and never knew there was a narrow-bordered 5 spot and finding it hard to see the diffrence , there was more about on Saterday, it would be intresting to try and get more photos to see if they are all the same in this area.
      Hoping to keep up with amount of information as I have learnt more, although it does take longer to write a post.

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  2. A brilliant and educational walk Amanda. I'm going to have to take your blog with me when I go for a walk at the weekend to make sure I am identifying the right wild flowers! Have a wonderful week xx

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    1. Hi Chel, and thank you for stopping by, will be doing more posts like this so pop back.
      Amanda xx

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  3. Your posts are always so informative, with lovely photos to back up the info. I've learnt a lot about the indigenous wildlife and plants.
    Jacqui x

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    1. Thanks Jacqui, so glad you enjoyed this post.

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  4. A lovely and really informative post with some wonderful flowers, moth and butterflies. It looks a great place to walk. Id can be difficult - I can struggle for hours and the more resources I use the more confusing it can sometimes be! I tend to rely on books more than the internet because, as you say, photos etc., can be wrongly labelled.

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    1. Thanks RR, I have lots of books (I love books) on all subject, but more on wild flowers, I use them a lot , and often will sit and look through them again and again. I'm trying to learn the flower keys.
      Amanda xx

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  5. Replies
    1. Thanks Roy, I love big open spaces, and I'm trying to get that feeling in my photos using lots of sky.
      Amanda xx

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  6. What beautiful photos. Your close-ups are as lovely as your wider landscapes, and you caught that setting sun perfectly. I feel strangely calm after reading this post, thank you!

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    1. Thanks Gillian, I'm realy pleased you enjoyed my post. As I was taking the photo of the sky a man stopped and said " isn't that beautiful , I would not have seen it, only looked to see what you were photographing"
      We have some lovely places here in Yorkshire (Leeds)
      Amanda xxx

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  7. You certainly know your wildflowers - I don't! Can usually manage to ID the ones in my garden but some have taken me years to find out what they are. Lovely set of photos and interesting post.
    The spiders web looks like a Nursery Web (Pisaura mirabilis, the Nusery Web Spider). Mum spins this web and puts the egg sac inside then stands guard. I have found 4 recently, first time ever but they don't seem to stay in the web for long and mum seems to have left before babies disperse. I was going to put the pics on my blog but at this rate I'll never do it!!!

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    1. Thanks Mandy, I knew you would come up trumps with the spider ID, I did try really hard to get it right (I was thinking of you) .
      Amanda xx

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  8. Lovely photos though I have to say all those hatching spiders made me shudder! Gorgeous shot of the sunlight coming through the clouds you really were in the right place at the right time. x

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    1. Thanks Julie, just on with writing a post about the same place but during the day, the spiders were realy tiny once in the grass you would not be able to see them.

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