Monday, 20 March 2017

Edinburgh.. Day two



Day two was a bright and breezy day.
We were up before the shops opened so went for a walk , discovering some of the many streets of the Royal Mile. Even the back streets had impressive buildings. It soon came apparent there was so much to see and do, a few days was not going to be enough.






I also discovered soon on the buildings were so big it was impossible to fit  them into one photo. People, scaffolding and modern day ' stuff' kinda spoiled the photo.

Filling Station American Restaurant

We had breakfast a few  times here and a evening meal... Lovely place. 



Then for a trip round the Castle.

This most famous of Scottish castles has a complex building history. The oldest part, St Margaret's Chapel, dates from the 12th century; the Great Hall was erected by James IV around 1510; the Half Moon Battery by the Regent Morton in the late 16th century; and the Scottish National War Memorial after the First World War.



From the castle you could see for miles...Monuments on Calton Hill, and how big the station is in the bottom.


and all though a little hazy the Fourth bridge and New Queensferry Crossing




The castle houses the Honours (Crown Jewels) of Scotland, the Stone of Destiny, the famous 15th century gun Mons Meg, the One O' Clock Gun and the National War Museum of Scotland.


It's a very interesting place as well as moving, the names of all the soldiers who died in battle.
Many of the areas you were not aloud to take photos, War Museum and Destiny stone. We also shared our visit with hundreds of students , all speaking different langues . Lets just say some were not interested !

The Great Hall


A wonder of medieval Scotland, the Great Hall was completed in 1511 for James IV and stands at the heart of the castle.

Its magnificent wooden roof is one of the most remarkable in Britain. Giant beams rest on stones engraved with heads and important symbols like the thistle – a badge of Scotland.




 Thinking of Ragged Robbin I often look for Green Men....
Later in the week we spent some time in St Giles Cathedral, there are supposed to be 66 there hidden in the roof !


St Margaret's Chapel

St Margaret's Chapel, in Edinburgh Castle, is the oldest surviving building in Edinburgh, An example of Romanesque architecture, it is a category A listed building. It was constructed in the 12th century, but fell into disuse after the Reformation. In the 19th century the chapel was restored and today is cared for by the St Margaret's Chapel Guild.

IT'S A VERY small chapel - it doesn't hold more than about twenty people


We were now ready for a coffee and cake, back down the Royal Mile to

Patisserie Valerie

A must... it was lovely.




Filled with sugar and caffeine we walked across the North bridge to

Princes Street.

Still lined with amazing buildings

Balmoral Hotel

Balmoral Hotel

The Balmoral is a luxury five-star property and landmark in Edinburgh, Scotland. It is located in the heart of the city at the east end of Princes Street, the main shopping street beneath the Edinburgh Castle rock, and the southern edge of the New Town.

Scott Monument

The Scott Monument is a Victorian Gothic monument to Scottish author Sir Walter Scott. It is the largest monument to a writer in the world.It stands in Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh, opposite the Jenners department store on Princes Street and near to Edinburgh Waverley Railway Station, which is named after Scott's Waverley novels.



Scott Monument

The tower is 200 feet 6 inches (61.11 m) high, and has a series of viewing platforms reached by a series of narrow spiral staircases giving panoramic views of central Edinburgh and its surroundings. The highest platform is reached by a total of 287 steps. It is built from Binny sandstone quarried near Ecclesmachan in West Lothian


And yes we climbed to the very top , I was soooooooo scared as it was so high but very windy. The chap who had just come down from the very top said the building was moving, this did not help. As you walked up the steps got tighter and smaller, OH could just fit through. At one point I thought  my legs were going to give way as they were shaking so much..



Just half way up...



.In total (excluding Scott and his dog) there are 68 figurative statues on the monument of which 64 are visible from the ground. Four figures are placed above the final viewing gallery and are only visible by telephoto or (at a very distorted angle) from the viewing gallery itself. In addition, eight kneeling Druid figures support the final viewing gallery. There are 32 unfilled niches at higher level.



In the middle there is a room, with stained glass windows all the way round.




Glad to be on the ground we had a walk along Princes Street and back along Rose Street, which is just behind.


Later that night we had a walk down to the bottom of the Royal mile and discovered

Scotland's Parliament building

Scotland's Parliament sits at the foot of Edinburgh's famous Royal Mile in front of the spectacular Holyrood Park and Salisbury Crags. Constructed from a mixture of steel, oak, and granite, the complex building was hailed on opening as one of the most innovative designs in Britain today.

(this photo was taken from Calton Hill. )

Right at the bottom of The Royal Mile is

Palace of Holyroodhouse
 (referred to as Holyrood Palace)

The Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh is the official residence of Her Majesty The Queen in Scotland.

.


Sadly we did not get time to look round.



Well we have made it to the end of Tuesday  and we were shattered !!

Tomorrow is the zoo and  Calton Hill.


Five wonderful days in EDINBURGH....Day one